Recent Posts

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1
Recently published / Re: Tanypodinae - new taxa
« Last post by Martin Spies on February 26, 2020, 06:11:57 AM »
2020

Silva, F. L. da, Pinho, L. C. (2020) Macropelopia (Macropelopia) patagonica, a new Tanypodinae (Diptera: Chironomidae) from the Patagonian Andes. Zootaxa 4731(4): 574-580. [publd 10.ii.2020]

Tang, H., Niitsuma, H. (2020) Review of the genus Amnihayesomyia Niitsuma (Diptera: Chironomidae: Tanypodinae), with descriptions of three new species from China. Zootaxa 4743(3): 411-418. [publd 26.ii.2020]
2
Established earlier / Re: Keys
« Last post by Martin Spies on February 25, 2020, 09:00:49 AM »
2020

Cuppen, H., Gresens, S. E., Tempelman, D. (2020) Description of the larvae of Cricotopus festivellus (Kieffer 1906) and Cricotopus diversus (Boesel 1983) with keys to discrimination of larval, pupal and adult stages (Diptera: Chironomidae). CHIRONOMUS J. Chironomidae Res. 33: 4-16. [publd online (25.ii.2020)]

Tang, H., Niitsuma, H. (2020) Review of the genus Amnihayesomyia Niitsuma (Diptera: Chironomidae: Tanypodinae), with descriptions of three new species from China. Zootaxa 4743(3): 411-418. [publd 26.ii.2020]
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Recently published / Re: Orthocladiinae - new taxa
« Last post by Martin Spies on February 13, 2020, 03:33:57 AM »
2020

Fasbender, A. (2020) Oropuella, a new genus of Orthocladiinae from the western Nearctic. CHIRONOMUS J. Chironomidae Res. 33: 17-30. [publd online (12.ii.2020)]

Imada, Y. (2020) A novel leaf-rolling chironomid, Eukiefferiella endobryonia sp. nov. (Diptera, Chironomidae, Orthocladiinae), highlights the diversity of underwater chironomid tube structures. ZooKeys 906: 73-111.

Song, Ch., Zheng, J. Wang, X. Qi, X. (2020) A new species of Limnophyes Eaton (Diptera: Chironomidae) from Xizang, China. Zootaxa 4722(3): 295-300. [publd 14.i.2020]
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Established earlier / Re: New publications on various taxa
« Last post by Martin Spies on February 12, 2020, 06:22:32 AM »
2020

Cuppen, H., Gresens, S. E., Tempelman, D. (2020) Description of the larvae of Cricotopus festivellus (Kieffer 1906) and Cricotopus diversus (Boesel 1983) with keys to discrimination of larval, pupal and adult stages (Diptera: Chironomidae). CHIRONOMUS J. Chironomidae Res. 33: 4-16. [publd online (25.ii.2020)]

Donato, M., Zanotto Arpellino, J. P., Siri, A. (2020) Description of the pupa of Tanytarsus alatus Paggi (1992) (Chironominae: Tanytarsini). CHIRONOMUS J. Chironomidae Res. 33: 4 pp. [publd online (12.ii.2020)]
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Recently published / Re: Chironominae - new taxa
« Last post by Martin Spies on February 09, 2020, 06:17:56 AM »
2020

Dantas, G. P. S., Araujo, A. A. H., Hamada, N. (2020) A new species of Rheotanytarsus Thienemann & Bause (Diptera: Chironomidae) from Peruvian Andes, with updated key to South American species. Zootaxa 4722(2): 195-200. [publd 13.i.2020]

Han, W., Wei, J., Lin, X., Tang, H. (2020) The Afro–Oriental genus Yaeprimus Sasa et Suzuki (Diptera: Chironomidae: Chironomini): Phylogeny, new species and expanded diagnoses. Diversity 12(1, paper 31): 1-19. [publd 15.i.2020]

Song, Ch., Wang, X., Bu, W., Qi, X. (2020) Morphology lies: a case-in-point with a new non-biting midge species from Oriental China (Diptera, Chironomidae). ZooKeys 909: 67-77. [The species name proposed as new looks to be a junior synonym of Kiefferulus nodulosus (Hashimoto in Hashimoto et al., 1981).]
6
Uncertain / Unpublished / Re: Chironomini
« Last post by Laci Hamerlik on February 07, 2020, 03:59:34 AM »
Thank you, Martin!

All the best
Laci
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Uncertain / Unpublished / Re: Chironomini
« Last post by Martin Spies on February 07, 2020, 03:54:37 AM »
Dear Laci and all,

I strongly suspect a species of Polypedilum potentially related to the Nearctic P. braseniae. I have photographs of larvae with such menta from two countries in the western Palaearctic: The Netherlands and Turkey. As always in such cases, it is possible that the biological species already has a scientific name based on another life stage, but that the larva remains to be associated.

Cheers,

Martin Spies
8
Uncertain / Unpublished / Chironomini
« Last post by Laci Hamerlik on February 07, 2020, 03:14:20 AM »
Dear all,

this Chironomini was found in the gut content of a goby in the Bulgarian strech of Danube. Do you have any idea what it could be?

Thank you
Laci
9
Uncertain / Unpublished / Re: Micropsectra curvicornis
« Last post by Laci Hamerlik on February 07, 2020, 02:52:56 AM »
Thank you, Martin, for higly competent answer, as usual!

All the best,
Laci
10
Uncertain / Unpublished / Re: Micropsectra curvicornis
« Last post by Martin Spies on January 28, 2020, 10:47:18 AM »
Dear Laci, dear all,

The name Micropsectra curvicornis has continued to be used by people still keying their larval material with Chernovskii (1949) - in some cases because there is no 'better' key for the respective area. Because of this rather frequent and wide usage of the name, it would probably have little effect in practice to remind such colleagues that 'technically', Micropsectra curvicornis is a nomen dubium, because Chernovskii's brief diagnosis is likely to apply to the larvae of more than a single species, and because it is unknown whether any of Chernovskii's material is still available and informative.

All that said, however, Mothes (1968: 94 in Annls zool. fenn. 5) claimed to have single-reared such larvae from two lakes in Brandenburg state, Germany, and identified the associated adults as Tanytarsus curticornis Kieffer sensu Lindeberg (1963)[which isn't necessarily the same species as Kieffer's!]. Astutely picking up on Mothes' work, Moller Pillot & Goddeeris (2001) in their "Identificatiesleutel voor Tanytarsus larven van Nederland en België" (13 pp.; distributed by the authors) keyed such larvae to "T. brundini / T. curticornis".

'So far, so good' one may think, but chironomids rarely let you off their hooklets this easily. As the Dutch authors' brundini/curticornis term probably reflects, the corresponding biological radiation does not appear to be fully resolved systematically and, thus, the corresponding usage of scientific species names is in disarray as well. For just one example here, pupal exuviae from the Thienemann sample that had produced Kieffer's adult type specimens of T. curticornis run to T. brundini in today's keys.

You can imagine that I could continue this for a long while, but I won't prove that here. Instead, I'd be grateful to hear from anyone who might have evidence that may allow morphological species separation of larvae with long, curved antennal pedestal projections like those in Chernovskii's (1949) illustration, which has been copied by most authors writing about these beasts.

Cheers,

---

Martin Spies
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